Women's Lives and Politics: Microform Collections

Women's Lives and Politics:Microform Collections in the Cornell University Library

The views and activities of leaders of various women's movements, in the United States and internationally, are documented in microfilm collections available in Cornell's libraries. Collections also document women's engagement in the anti-slavery, peace, and labor movements. Additionally, they can provide windows into women's daily lives, friendships and relationships, and identities. Offering a wealth of material for scholarly investigation, these sets reproduce the official records of women's political organizations, contemporary media accounts of feminist activities, as well as the personal papers and diaries of individuals.

For microform sets housed in Olin Library, the microform guides are shelved in the Reference Collection, arranged by their film/fiche guide number. The microfilm reels and microfiche are in the Microforms and Newspapers Section on the lower level of Olin Library.


Title List of Collections:

Full List of Collections:

[A - H]     [I - P]      [Q - Z] [A - H]     [I - P]      [Q - Z]

 


A - H

Advice Books, Manuals, Almanacs, and Journals, 1625-1837 from the Bodleian Library, Oxford

American Association of University Women Archives, 1881 - 1976

American Women's Diaries: New England

American Women's Diaries: Southern Women

American Women's Diaries: Western Women

Archives of the Fabian Society, Part 5, Papers and Records of the Fabian Women's Group, 1919-1951

Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching Papers, 1930-1942

The Blackwell Family Papers

Brazil's Popular Groups: A Microfilm Collection of Materials Issued by Socio-Political, Religious, Labor and Minority Grass-Roots Organizations, 1966-1986; 1987-1989; 1990-1992; 1993; 1994

Caroline H. Dall papers, 1811-1917

A Change in Attitude: Women, War and Society, 1914-1918. Part 3: Employment

The Collected Correspondence of Lydia Maria Child, 1817-1880

Cornell University Collection of Women's Rights Pamphlets

The Diary of Beatrice Webb, 1873-1943

Emma Goldman Papers

Herstory: Women's History Collection

History of Women: Pamphlets

I - P

International Women's Suffrage. Part I, Suffrage Correspondence of Rose Scott (1847-1925) from the State Library of New South Wales

International Women's Year World Conference (1975) Documents

Ladies of Llangollen: Letters and Journals of Lady Eleanor Butler (1739-1829) and Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1831) from the National Library of Wales

Mercy Warren Papers, 1709 - 1841

National American Woman Suffrage Association Records, 1850-1960

National Woman's Party Papers: 1913 - 1974

National Woman's Party Papers: The Suffrage Years, 1913 - 1920

National Women's Trade Union League of America Records, 1903 - 1950

The Papers of Carrie Chapman Catt

The Papers of Eleanor Roosevelt, 1933 - 1945

The Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony

Papers of Hannah Clothier Hull, 1889 - 1958

The Papers of Susan B. Anthony

Papers of the League of Women Voters, 1918 - 1974

Papers of the Women's Trade Union League and its Principal Leaders, 1855 - 1964, bulk 1903 - 1950.

Q - Z

Records of the Bureau of Vocational Information, 1908 - 1932

Records of the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Dept. of Labor, 1918 - 1965

Records Relating to the Birmingham Ladies Society for the Relief of British Negro Slaves, 1825-1919

Sex & Sexuality, 1640-1940: Literary, Medical and Sociological Perspectives

Sexual Politics in Britain

The Twentieth Century Trade Union Woman: Oral history project

What Women Wrote: Scenarios, 1912-1929

Women in America: Margaret Sanger

Women, Suffrage and Politics, The Papers of Sylvia Pankhurst, 1882-1960

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Papers, 1915-1978

Women's studies manuscript collections from the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College. Series 3, Sexuality, Sex Education, and Reproductive Rights. Part A, Family Planning Oral History Project

Women's studies manuscript collections from the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College. Series 1, Woman's suffrage. Part B, New York.


A - H
Advice Books, Manuals, Almanacs, and Journals, 1625-1837 from the Bodleian Library, Oxford. Oxford: Adam Matthew, 1993.
20 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6994

Focuses on prescriptive literature and conduct books, including household manuals, letter-writing manuals, guidance books on marriage and bringing up children, advice books on diet, health and law, guides to the education of young women, and descriptions of correct moral behavior. There are also examples of women's literature, song-books written for women, fashion guides and almanac from 1706-1840.

American Association of University Women Archives, 1881-1976. Sanford, NC: Microfilming Corp. of America, 1980.
158 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 5786

"Study without action is futile - action without study is fatal."

The AAUW was formed in 1921 as an organization committed to improving the status of women in academic professions. Since its inception this Association has played a crucial role in opening doors for the educated woman in society. These Archives record important contributions in the history of women's accomplishments and changing status in education and work-related fields. The General and Administrative reports show the history of the Association's programs related to women and education, its educational foundations and its involvement with other organizations, such as the International Federation of University Women. Research reports cover legislative issues concerning women, mass media, social and economic concerns, and international relations. A first-hand account of the difficulties encountered by a nineteenth century professional woman trying to further her career is revealed in the papers of Ida H. Hyde, scientist, educator and AAUW member.

American Women's Diaries: New England. New Canaan, CT : Readex Film Products, 1984.
21 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 5663

These eight diaries reveal women's views and opinions on 18th and 19th century events and issues such as slavery, abolition, national affairs and international relations. Because women's views rarely achieved public expression, these diaries add a new historic perspective beyond their literary value.

American Women's Diaries: Southern Women. New Canaan, CT : Readex Film Products, 1989.
29 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6329

Over thirty Southern diarists provide insights on women's education, religious experiences, careers, and opinions on slavery and women's rights from the early 19th century through the First World War. Many of the diarists were well educated; some traveled extensively. Most were Euro-American women, ranging from recent immigrants to members of well established Southern families. Their careers ranged from teaching to nursing to professional author and business woman. Included are the diaries of Emma Mordecai (1812-1906), daughter of a prominent Jewish Merchant in Richmond, Virginia, and the diaries of Millie J. McCreary (b.1858), a young educated black woman who taught at the Atlanta Baptist Seminary (now Morehouse College).

American Women's Diaries: Western Women. New Canaan, CT: Readex Film Products, [1991?]
26 microfilm reels, questionnaire, and guide
Olin Microfilm 6426

Over 500 works by and about women in the Western U.S. during the 18th and 19th centuries, including: a dictated autobiography of a woman discussing the origins of Utah's black community; documentation of Euro-American attitudes toward Native Americans; narratives from several Mormon women; and an interview with a Native American woman raised by a Euro-American family. The diaries, letters, WPA interviews, and oral histories are primary sources for the study of women and religion, expansionist history, and women's daily lives. The variety of women's work lives is represented, from store clerk to cotton mill worker to farmer to health care provider.

Archives of the Fabian Society.. Hassocks, Sussex: Harvester Press, 1975-1984.
set has 5 parts in 193 pieces and guide
Olin Microfiche 284

The Fabian Society was founded in 1884 and rapidly became Britain's foremost organization of socialist intellectuals. It has played a key role in the development of British democratic socialist thinking, in the development of the Labour Party, the philosophy and programs of the British welfare state, and the founding of the London School of Economics. Part 5 of this set contains Papers and records of the Fabian Women's Group, 1919-1951 among the records of other bodies.

Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching Papers, 1930-1942. New York: NYT Microfilming Corporation of America, 1983.
8 microfilm reels
Olin Microfilm 6083 and guide

This small group of women, founded by Jessie Daniel Ames, formed as a special offshoot of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation; it merged back into the CIC in 1942. These papers included correspondence, reports, clippings, pamphlets, legislative materials, meeting minutes, petitions, questionnaires, speeches, and press-releases. The collection documents an attempt to mobilize local, regional, and federal public support for the goal of eradicating violent attacks and hangings by whites of blacks in the American south.

The Blackwell Family Papers. Washington, DC: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1979.
76 microfilm reels and register (Olin Reference Z6621 U59 B63+ 1985; c.2 in stacks)
Olin Microfilm 5812

The Blackwell family has held women's rights as a principle since the beginning of the woman's movement and has been deeply involved in the struggles for those rights. In 1849 Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to become an M.D. and in 1857 opened her own hospital staffed entirely by women. Eleven years later she opened the Woman's Infirmary Medical School with the help of her sister Emily, who had obtained her own medical degree. Their brother, Henry Blackwell, was a longtime public speaker for the rights of women and editor of Woman's Journal. In his marriage to Lucy Stone he repudiated the superior status given him and they declared themselves equal partners. Their daughter, Alice Stone Blackwell, was a key figure in the merger of the National and American Woman's Suffrage groups. Among the Blackwell Papers is a collection of diaries, manuscripts and correspondence which record the important roles played by the family members in the woman's rights movement.

Brazil's Popular Groups: A Microfilm Collection of Materials Issued by Socio-Political, Religious, Labor, and Minority Grass-Roots Organizations. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress Preservation Microfilming Office, 1966- 1995.
5 sets cover the years 1966-1994, as below.

(1) 1966-1986, Olin Microfilm 6183, 32 microfilm reels and guide. Reel 27 contains women pamphlets; reel 28, women serials.
(2) 1987-1989, Olin Microfilm 6618, 43 microfilm reels. Reel 1 contains an introduction and index; reels 38-42, materials related to women.
(3) 1990-1992, Olin Microfilm 6863, 70 microfilm reels. Reel 1 contains a guide to contents of the set; reels 66-69, materials related to women; reel 70, posters of agrarian reform and land issues through women.
(4) 1993, Olin Microfilm 6908, 32 microfilm reels and guide. Reels 30-31 contain materials related to women, reel 32, posters of agrarian reform and land issues through women.
(5) 1994, Olin Microfilm 6864, 18 microfilm reels. Reel 1 contains a guide to contents of the set; reel 8, homosexual and bisexual through human and civil rights; reel 17, women and feminists; reel 18, posters, agrarian reform and land issues through women and feminists.

Caroline H. Dall papers, 1811-1917. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1981
45 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6428

Caroline Healey Dall was a leading 19th century reformer, feminist, and essayist. She played a significant role in the antislavery movement, the Underground Railroad, and the drive for women's suffrage. An early proponent of women's rights in the workplace, she produced a variety of works, including Woman's Right to Labor (1860), Woman's Rights Under the Law (1861), and The College, the Market, and the Court (1867). This collection of her published works, manuscripts, letterbooks, notebooks, scrapbooks, and personal journals provides scholars in women's studies, religion, literature, and social and political history with a personal resource for in-depth study.

A Change in Attitude: Women, War and Society, 1914-1918. Part 3: Employment. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, n.d.
15 microfilm reels and guide
on order for ILR

Diaries, correspondence reports, pamphlets, memoranda and press cuttings reveal women's considerable achievements in all sectors of employment. The collection contains documents from many charitable and benevolent organizations, many of which were established by women during this critical period. Part 3 focuses on the employment of women in industrial production during the First World War and how this was the key to granting women's suffrage in 1918.

The Collected Correspondence of Lydia Maria Child, 1817-1880. Millwood, NY: Kraus Microform, 1980.
97 microfiche sheets and guide
Olin Microfiche 448

Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880) was an author an reformer. As a journalist and friend to many contemporary writers and artists, and an active participant in the antislavery movement, she was an excellent observer of her times. As a whole, the correspondence (2,604 letters) provides insight into the major political and social developments of the nineteenth century: the struggle against slavery, the rise of the religious debate, the growth of the women's rights movement, the coming of the Civil War, and the arrival of Reconstruction.
Cornell University Collection of Women's Rights Pamphlets. Wooster, Ohio : Bell & Howell, 1974.
117 microfiche sheets
Rare and Manuscript Collections, Kroch Library (originals) and Olin Microfiche 134

These 117 pamphlets published between 1814 and 1912 contain reports of organizational meetings and proceedings as well as representative writings of leading figures involved in the women's rights movement.

The Diary of Beatrice Webb, 1873-1943. Cambridge: Chadwyck-Healey, 1978
ILR Microfiche 124

Beatrice (Potter) Webb (1859-1947) was, along with husband Sidney, an English Socialist economist, early member of the Fabian Society, and co-founder of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Both were pioneers in social and economic reforms as well as distinguished historians, and deeply affected social thought and institutions in England. In 1891, Beatrice published The Co-operative Movement in Great Britain, a small book based on her experiences in Lancashire, which later became a classic. The Diary is a continuous but not daily record from 1873 to 1943 in two forms: the holograph diary in 57 exercise books and the typed transcript.

Emma Goldman Papers. Alexandria, Va. : Chadwyck-Healey, c1990-
69 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Library Microfilm 6421

"Let all reformers and radicals realize, once for all, that to love liberty means to become lawless, since freedom and law can never harmonize."

The comprehensive edition of the papers of Emma Goldman (1869-1940), anarchist and lifelong advocate of women's rights, freedom of expression, and social justice.

Herstory: Women's History Collection, roll 21, newsletters. Berkeley, CA: Women's History Library, [1972]
1 microfilm reel and guide
Olin Microfilm 4311

Women's newsletters dating from 1966-1971, including Shrew (Brisbane, Australia), Sisters Unite (Houston, TX), Skirting the Capitol (Sacramento, CA), Society for Humane Abortion Newsletter (San Francisco), Stephanie's Office Service (Syracuse, NY), Toronto Women's Liberation Movement Newsletter (Toronto, Ontario), Trans Sister: National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice (Chicago), and others. Part of the International Women's History Periodical Archive microfilmed by the Women's History Library, Berkeley, California.

History of Women: Pamphlets. New Haven, CT: Research Publications, [1975-1979?]
28 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6427
Also, 1 reel (#169), Mann Library Microfilm 4489

Approximately 2000 pamphlets covering subjects including religion, clubs, charitable societies, employment, education, suffrage and anti-suffrage, marriage, divorce, prostitution, free love, birth control, and health.

I - P

International Women's Suffrage. Part I, Suffrage Correspondence of Rose Scott (1847-1925) from the State Library of New South Wales [microform]. Wiltshire, England: A. Matthew Publishers, 1998.
Olin Microfilm 7053 and guide

Rose Scott (1847-1925) was instrumental in gaining the vote for women in New South Wales and was an important campaigner for suffrage, feminist, and gender related issues throughout Australia. She was also a noteworthy international correspondent, and her papers feature exchanges with fellow suffragists in Germany, Sweden, and America, including some lengthy letters from Carrie Chapman Catt of the International Women's Suffrage Alliance.

For those interested in world history and comparative women's studies, this collection offers an unusual opportunity to explore the experiences of women in different societies as they struggled for similar objectives. It is interesting to consider how women in New South Wales managed to win the vote in 1903, over a decade ahead of their sisters in Britain and the United States.

International Women's Year World Conference (1975) Documents. New York: UNIFO Publishers, Ltd., 1976.
Olin Microfiche 248 and index

Documents issued by World Conference of the International Women's Year, Conference Centre of the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 1975.

Ladies of Llangollen: Letters and Journals of Lady Eleanor Butler (1739-1829) and Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1831) from the National Library of Wales. Wiltshire, England: Adam Matthew Publications, 1997.
5 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Film 7025

In 1778 Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby eloped, in the face of strong opposition from their respective families, leaving their homes in Ireland to set up a new life together in Plas Newydd in Llangollen Vale, Wales. Butler and Ponsonby, who became known as the "Ladies of Llangollen," established a vigorous correspondence network, and their new Gothic residence soon became a magnet for writers and intellectuals including William Wordsworth, Madame de Genlis, Edmund Burke, and Anna Seward. This source will be valuable for those studying lesbian history, female friendships, the Gothic Pastoral Ideal, 18th Century Literary Circles, and the Romantic Movement.

Mercy Warren Papers, 1709-1841. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms International, 1986.
2 microfilm reels
Olin Microfilm 4654

Mercy Warren, born a member of the Otis family, was a prolific writer and historian. This collection of her personal papers and writings consists of a 500-page letterbook containing her correspondence to 35 prominent people, including Abigail, John, and Samuel Adams, Elbridge Gerry, Henry Knox, Mrs. John Hancock, and Martha Washington. Also included are 52 pages of Warren's published poetry. Mercy Warren is perhaps best known for her three-volume work, History of the Rise, Progress and Termination of the American Revolution (1805).

National American Woman Suffrage Association Records, . Washington, DC: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1981.
73 microfilm reels and register (Olin Reference Z6621 U59 B63 1985; c. 2 in stacks)
Olin Microfilm 5811

The Association was founded in 1890 when two differing woman's groups united in the common struggle for suffrage. The radical National Woman's Suffrage Association of women only, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, focused on activism in suffrage and working class issues through both national campaigning and their outspoken newspaper, Revolution. The other more moderate American Woman's Suffrage Association of middle and upper class women, concentrated specifically on the suffrage issue, both on a state-by-state basis and through its Woman's Journal. Because the groups were achieving only marginal success individually, they merged in a concerted effort devoted to suffrage. The records documenting this effort include a valuable scrapbook collection of newspaper and periodical reports of activities in the woman's rights movement from the years 1893 to 1912, as well as various other articles and papers relating to suffrage movements. The file on Woman's Journal is a prime source of documentation on the suffrage struggle.

National Woman's Party Papers: 1913-1974. Glen Rock, NJ: Microfilming Corp. of America, 1977-1978.
179 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 5818

The National Woman's Party Papers: 1913 - 1974 is a collection of primary source materials covering the founding and subsequent development of the National Woman's Party. The Party was formed from a merger of the Women's Political Union with the Congressional Union after Alice Paul and a group of women devoted to 'radical activity' in the fight for women's rights were expelled for 'militancy' from the Congressional Committee of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. The collection contains material by both NWP supporters and opponents, NWP official documents, including the complete minutes, legal and financial records, and a set of Government legislative reports concerning labor laws and the legal status of women. The files of correspondence and communications chronicle the controversy and discussion over several important women's issues such as the founding of the World Woman's Party, which extended the movement internationally, and the organization of a woman's suffrage march which disrupted Woodrow Wilson's 1913 inauguration. The Papers also trace the NWP's promotion of the Equal Rights Amendment which the Party succeeded in introducing to Congress in 1923 and fought for until 1972 when Congress passed it.

National Woman's Party Papers: The Suffrage Years, 1913-1920. Sanford, NC: Microfilming Corp. of America, c1981.
97 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 5819

This set complements the NWP Papers 1913-1974 and follows the steps taken by women suffragists to win a Federal Suffrage Amendment. The collection of correspondence, printed matter and photographs fully reveal the 'militant action' that was mobilized in each state in the demand for a federal decision. The set of administrative files and documentation concerning the formation of the NWP provides the details of campaign organization and strategy which had such great effect on the 1916 elections. One interesting example of militant action documented was the civil disobedience of 1917, when 218 women protesters were arrested and 97 others jailed for picketing Woodrow Wilson and the White House.

National Women's Trade Union League of America Records, 1903-1950. Washington, DC: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1976.
25 microfilm reels and guide
Kheel Center, Catherwood Library Microfilm 5709

This microfilm set includes the headquarters' records, subject files, convention proceedings, and proceedings and related papers of the International Congress/Federation of Working Women. For more information, see RLIN AMC record NYCW88-A26.

The Papers of Carrie Chapman Catt. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1979.
18 microfilm reels and register (Olin Reference Z6621 U59 B63+ 1985; c. 2 in stacks)
Olin Microfilm 5919

Carrie Chapman Catt's papers reveal her extensive involvement and interest in the causes of women's rights and world peace. It was greatly due to her efforts that the women's movement finally achieved suffrage. From 1915 as a NAWSA organizer she worked closely with Woodrow Wilson to introduce suffrage, while creating a 'secret plan' which outlined what each state organization had to do year by year to assure passage.

The Papers of Eleanor Roosevelt, 1933-1945. Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, 1986.
20 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6065

An activist in many issues and concerns of the 1930s and 1940s, Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the most important and influential figures contributing to the New Deal. Her involvement with youth organizations, social welfare policies and the concerns of Black Americans won great respect and admiration from many spheres of the American public. As a member of the League of Women Voters, she also worked hard to expand the opportunities for women in public life. The writings in this collection demonstrate Eleanor Roosevelt's avid interest and understanding of American political activities. The correspondence of both a personal and political nature, shows her constant awareness of domestic and foreign policies.

The Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Washington, DC: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1979.
5 microfilm reels (register with list on reel one)
Olin Microfilm 5268

One of the leading figures in the women's rights movement from the early 1840s till her death in 1902, Elizabeth Cady Stanton devoted much time and energy to traveling, speaking and writing for the emancipation of women. Her involvement and influence range from organizing the first woman's rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York, to being a major figure in struggles for suffrage.

Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Editors Patricia G. Holland and Ann D. Gordon. Wilmington, Del.: Scholarly Resources, 1992
45 reels, with printed guide and index.
Olin Microfilm 6500

Including holdings from over two hundred libraries and private collectors and printed matter from approximately 700 periodicals, this microfilm set allows a comprehensive look at the leadership of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) and Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) over a diverse, locally-based suffrage movement.

Papers of Hannah Clothier Hull, 1889-1958. Swarthmore: Swarthmore College, Peace Collection; Wilmington, DE : Scholarly Resources [distributor], 1978-
6 reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6501

Hull (1872-1958) was one of the founders of the Woman's Peace Party and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). A large part of the collection reflects Hull's work in the peace movement. Her interest in women's rights and some of her friendships are also documented. A file documenting attacks on the WILPF, 1924-1937 is included. Among the many correspondents are Jane Addams, Emily Greene Balch, Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Hamilton, Lida Gustoava Heymann, Lola Maverick Lloyd, Lucia Ames Mead, Jennette Rankin, Rosika Schwimmer, Anna Garlin Spencer, Ellen Gates Starr, and Mary E. Woolley. Among Hull's early personal correspondence is a folder of letters she wrote to her friend Caroline Cooper Biddle.

The Papers of Susan B. Anthony. Washington, DC: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1978.
7 microfilm reels
Olin Microfilm 5858

Together Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) and her lifelong friend, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, collaborated to create some of the strongest arguments and written works in support of the women's rights movement in the late 1800s. She headed the National Suffrage Association in 1892 and traveled widely, speaking and gathering data and information for their work.

Papers of the League of Women Voters, 1918-1974: Part 3. Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, 1985.
64 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 5987

The League of Women Voters was founded in 1918 with the objective to guide and educate women citizens about their new responsibilities as voters. The League also worked in several areas, state and national, to improve the legal status of women. Members lobbied for issues such as the right of women to hold office or jury duty, and the 1922 Cable Act that protected citizenship rights of married women. The League also focused on creating communication and cooperation with women's groups internationally.

The files in this collection contain all departmental and national program files of the League, as well as the files of several other related organizations. The personal correspondence of many prominent figures such as Carrie Chapman Catt reveal the personal clashes and confrontations that provoked changes in political ideologies and tactics.

Papers of the Women's Trade Union League and its principal leaders, 1855- 1964, bulk 1903-1950.. Woodbridge, Conn.: Research Publications, 1981.
131 microfilm reels and guide
Kheel Center, Catherwood Library Microfilm 5690

Founded in 1903, this league formed the unique union of middle and working class women working for social reform and against the exploitation of women. Despite great difficulties in being accepted as a Union, the League furthered the social and political development of women's rights and causes.

Consists of nine parts, including eleven collections: 1. Margaret Dreier Robins papers (66 reels); 2. National Women's Trade Union League papers (4 reels); 3. Mary Anderson papers (4 reels); 4. Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League (25 reels); 5. Leonora O'Reilly papers (13 reels); 6. Rose Schneiderman Papers (2 reels); 7. Agnes Nestor papers (7 reels); 8. Smaller collections: Mary Kenney O'Sullivan autobiography; Boston Women's Trade Union League collections; Chicago Women's Trade Union League collection (1 reel); 9. Women's Trade Union League publications (9 reels).

For more information see RLIN AMC record NYCW88-A17.

Q - Z

Records of the Bureau of Vocational Information, 1908-1932. Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, 1989.
28 microfilm reels and guide
ILR Library, in process ANC4964; shelved in Kheel Center, Catherwood Library under no. 5919

The Bureau of Vocational Information of New York City (BVI) was the successor to the Intercollegiate Bureau of Occupations. Its purpose was to gather and distribute information concerning vocational opportunities for women. This collection contains correspondence; numerous questionnaires; printed items concerning women's employment, education, and training; most issues of BVI's News Bulletin (1922-1926); files on occupations; and an extensive "Study of Secretarial Work." Filmed from the holdings of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America.

Records of the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor, 1918-1965. Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, 1986-
68 microfilm reels and guide
Kheel Center, Catherwood Library Microfilm 5762

The U.S. Congress established a federal Women's Bureau in the U.S. Department of Labor in 1920 with the mandate to "investigate and improve" conditions for women workers. Although never a large or powerful agency, it sometimes achieved amazing results.

Part 1 of the Bureau's records consists of four series summarizing its work from the time of its predecessor, the Woman in Industry Service, to the mid 1960s and providing regular summaries of the Bureau's activities and policy positions. Part II focuses on women in World War II, and includes unpublished studies and war community surveys as well as correspondence files on war industries.

Records Relating to the Birmingham Ladies Society for the Relief of British Negro Slaves, 1825-1919. East Ardsley, Eng: Micro Methods, Ltd., 1970.
2 microfilm reels
Olin Microfilm 3520 and guide

The Society's aims were to inform the public of the wrongs inflicted on slaves, to send donations to the national movement, to relieve deserted slaves and to try to educate slaves in the British Colonies.

Sex & Sexuality, 1640-1940: Literary, Medical and Sociological Perspectives. Marlborough, Wiltshire, England: Adam Matthew Publications, 1998.
Olin Microfilm 7084

"This series sets out to provide the raw material for the dialogue already started by Roy Porter and Lesley Hall in The Facts of Life: The Creation of Sexual Knowledge in Britain, 1650-1950." In this microfilm set, a researcher can find reproductions of a variety of texts on sexuality from the 17th century onwards, from self-help manuals and moral tracts written for the general public to medical dissertations, treatises of the sexologists, and works of literature. Topics over this period included sexual habits, reproduction, masturbation, prostitution, and sexual pathologies.

With these texts (and others available in our Library's Rare and Manuscript Collections), one may study perceptions of the body and the sexual mores, practices, and beliefs of earlier time periods.

Sexual Politics in Britain. Hassocks, Eng.: Harvester Press, 1976-
520 microfiche sheets and guide (Olin Reference Z 7164 S42 S53; c. 2 in stacks)
Olin Library Microfiche 1200

Documents the emergence in the late 1960s of the movements for social, economic, political, and ideological liberation of women and homosexual men in England, Scotland, and Ireland. The collection consists of magazines, newsletters, journals, minutes of meetings, conference reports, annual reports, memos, press releases, transcripts, manifestos, and other similar materials, produced by approximately thirty groups and publishers. Most date from 1972, but the earliest is 1967.

The Twentieth Century Trade Union Woman: Oral History Project. Sanford, NC: Microfilming Corporation of America, 1979.
61 microfiche sheets (41 interview transcripts)
ILR Microfiche 140

This set of interviews portrays the roles of women in American labor struggles. Forty-one interviewees discuss their lives and families as well as the events and beliefs that led them to become involved in union organizations.
What Women Wrote: Scenarios, 1912-1929. Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, 1987.
2 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6392

A collection of scenarios from 1912 through 1929 written solely by women and compiled from the holdings of the Copyright Office of the Library of Congress. It represents an era when women were particularly active in film-writing. In many cases, copies of films no longer exist, so the scenarios are the primary sources for the study of these early films. The collection broadly represents famous to lesser-known writers, genres, and written formats. Because of the nature of the materials submitted for copyright deposit, some of the microfilm copies are not clear.

Women in America: Margaret Sanger. Washington, DC: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1988.
16 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6425

Margaret Sanger (1879-1966) is famous for her battles to legalize the dissemination of contraceptive information and open birth control clinics. This collection of correspondence and scrapbooks (1903-1938) and diaries (1914-1953) provides details on her complex career, including: her training as a nurse and connections with the medical profession; her involvement with the radical labor left and her part in the activities of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW); and her repeated confrontation with the law over the issue of birth control, the establishment of the American Birth Control League and a nationwide system of clinics.

Women, Suffrage and Politics: The Papers of Sylvia Pankhurst, 1882-1960: from the Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis, Amsterdam. Reading, Berkshire, England : Adam Matthew Publications, 1991.
37 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6732

Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst (1882-1960) played leading roles in the English women's suffrage movement, anti-fascist and pacifist organizations, international socialism, and the Pan-African movement. The microfilm set includes her personal archive, literary writings, and family papers; records of the East London Federation of Suffragettes, 1913-1920, and other papers documenting her activities in the women's suffrage movement, 1905-1930; notes from her journeys to Soviet Russia, the USA, Scandinavia, and Rumania; and files on the Russian Revolution, the First World War, the Italian invasion of Ethiopia, and the Pan-African movement, 1936-1960. She was editor of The New Times and Ethiopia News, 1936-1956, and the Ethiopia Observer, 1956-1960.

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Papers, 1915-1978. Sanford, NC: Microfilming Corporation of America, 1983.
114 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 5609

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom has been and continues to be one of the most influential international organizations for peace. It has opened avenues of action for women through its campaigns for nuclear disarmament and responses to international crises and events.

Women's Studies Manuscript Collections from the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College. Series 3, Sexuality, Sex Education, and Reproductive Rights. Part A, Family Planning Oral History Project. Bethesda, MD : University Publications of America, c1994-
3 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6766

Transcripts of an ambitious oral history project undertaken by the Schlesinger Library during the 1970s. The interviewees discuss the politics and ethics of reproduction, including birth control, abortion, sex education, marriage counseling, and maternal and infant health and welfare.

Interviewee Constance Cook, who as a New York State Representative authored legislation repealing the New York State abortion law in 1970 and who later became Cornell University's first woman vice president, discusses women's rights and her impressions of Betty Friedan and Nelson Rockefeller. Other interviewees include:

Beatrice Blair (Director of the New York State Abortion Education Program);
Sarah R. Weddington (President of National Abortion Rights Action League and counsel before the U.S. Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade);
Estelle Griswold (Executive Director, Planned Parenthood Federation of American and plaintiff in Griswold v Connecticut, in which the Supreme Court declared Connecticut's birth control laws unconstitutional);
Sadja Goldsmith, M.D. (physician with the International Planned Parenthood Federation);
Mary Steichen Calderone (Medical Director for Planned Parenthood Federation of American and later Chair of the Sex Information and Education Council of the United States);
Patricia Maginnis (founder, Society for Humane Abortion, discussing the Roman Catholic Church and her educational and political work); and
Martha May Eliot, M.D. (Chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau).

Women's Studies Manuscript Collections from the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College. Series 1, Woman's suffrage. Part B, New York. Bethesda, MD: University Publications of America, c1990-
15 microfilm reels and guide
Olin Microfilm 6721

Papers of leaders in New York's woman's suffrage movement show the ways that the efforts of upper-class society contrast with those of middle-class suffragists. Included are the papers of Harriet Burton Laidlaw, also active in the fight against the "white slave trade," and middle-class organizer Helen Brewster Owens from Ithaca.


Thanks go to the University's Women's Studies Program for helping the Library purchase many of these sets and to Janie Harris, Bibliographer of Government, Economics and Sociology, and Siobhan Moss '86 who composed and annotated the original version of this list. Brenda J. Marston, Women's Studies Selector, updated this list in September, 1994.

In 1991, the Women's Studies Program and the Merryweather Fund supported the acquisition of three important sets: the Emma Goldman Papers; Caroline H. Dall Papers; and American Women's Diaries: Western Women. Earlier, the Women's Studies Program and the Ellis H. Robison Fund helped purchase five other important sets: the Blackwell Family Papers; National Woman's Party Papers: The Suffrage Years, 1913 -1920; National Woman's Party Papers: 1913 - 1974; National American Woman Suffrage Association Records; and the American Association of University Women: Archives, 1881 - 1976.

The most recent revision was completed in January, 1998, by Susan Szasz Palmer, Reference Services Division, Olin*Kroch*Uris Libraries. Many annotations come from directly publisher information or other printed guides to microform collections.


Originally developed January 1999 by Suzy Szasz Palmer and Brenda Marston

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